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Panoramic x-ray
In order to assess your teeth and jaw bone, we will need a panoramic x-ray image. This type of x-ray provides a two-dimensional overview of the teeth and jaw. The image should not be older than 3 months, and no dental work should be performed between the time of x-ray imaging and the risk assessment.
sample image Panoramic x-ray
What information does a jaw x-ray provide?

o Signs of chronic or acute inflammation - Heavy metal deposits in the dental roots - Loosening of the bone - Fatty degeneration due to exposure to solvents, pesticides and other environmental pollutants - Impaired healing of the dental alveoli, chronic inflammation of the jawbone - Bone pockets and bone loss with gingivitis - Bone loss around implants - The location of impacted teeth - Incomplete root fillings - Cysts and root granulomas (chronic encapsulated inflammation at the root of the tooth) - Foreign bodies, pieces of metal or root residues after extractions
Digital cone beam dental CT scanning (CBCT)

Digital cone beam dental CT scanning for short CBCT, provides a three-dimensional image of your mouth from the frontal sinus to the upper cervical vertebrae. Unlike two-dimensional panoramic x-ray images which have a validity rate of around 50 percent CBCT scanning show the exact location and size of pathological changes in all three dimensions. This allows for precise surgical planning and a minimally invasive approach. CBCT is similar to computed tomography (CT). A 180- or 360-degree x-ray tube creates computer images which are then assembled into a three-dimensional picture. The radiation dose of the device we use (3D exam, Kavo Gendex, identical in construction with i-cat) is roughly the same as that of a panoramic x-ray. CBCT scanning allows us to draw very precise conclusions about various pathological changes in the mouth, bones and sinuses.

A three-dimensional CBCT can identify:
- The path of the nervus mandibularis with side branches
- Bony path of the maxillary sinus
- Heavy metal deposits in and near dental roots
- Bone disintegration and fatty degeneration due to exposure to solvents and/or pesticides
- Impaired healing of the dental alveoli, chronically inflamed sections of bone
- Deep bone pockets and general bone loss due to gingivitis
- Bone loss around implants
- The location of impacted and excess teeth
- Incomplete and overstuffed root fillings
- Cysts and root granulomas (chronic encapsulated inflammation at the dental root)
- Foreign bodies, pieces of metal or root residues after extractions

The following areas can also be assessed:
- Frontal sinuses (lower third), ethmoidal cells, sphenoid sinus, maxillary sinus, nasal cavity
- Temporomandibular joints (degenerative changes)
- First cervical vertebra
- Bone dimension and bone density in 3D for implantation planning
Scansione nelle 3 dimensioni
Referto dell'articolazione mascellare
Referto sugli esiti patologici